Monthly Archives: June 2012

Friday Fun – What’s your favorite quote (this week)?

I think if I had to pick one of these entertaining quotations, it would definitely be the red shoes! My dance shoes are red.

Live to Write - Write to Live

Friday Fun is a group post from the writers of the NHWN blog. Each week, we’ll pose and answer a different, writing-related question. We hope you’ll join in by providing your answer in the comments.

QUESTION: What’s your favorite quote … this week?

Susan Nye:
Life is short. Wear red shoes.

.

.

.

Lisa J. Jackson: The person who starts the race is different from

the person who finishes the race.

.

.

.

.

Deborah Lee Luskin: “This too shall pass.” – in reference to the current heat wave.

.

.

.

.

.

Wendy Thomas: “So much has been said and sung of beautiful young girls, why doesn’t somebody wake up to the beauty of old women?” Harriet Beech Stowe

.

.

.


Jamie Wallace: Not a shred of evidence exists in favor of the idea that life is serious.

– Brandan Gill

View original post

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The quiet moon

20120628-194414.jpg

Leave a comment

Filed under pictures, thinking

Summer at last?

20120620-154702.jpg

Leave a comment

Filed under pictures, seasons, Uncategorized

Thinking time

20120615-171854.jpg

Leave a comment

Filed under books, thinking

Thinking Environments 2

Well I had a go at using the thinking environment approach (see Klein (1998) Time to Think, and (2008) More Time to Think) with a group (see previous post dated 4 June for discussion about using it with one to one meetings). Using it with a group was productive. We achieved a lot, enjoyed ourselves and came away with new ideas and a project to work on together to enhance student experience for a specific group. The meeting wasn’t shorter though! I suspect I was really just trying to do too much in an hour and a half (we took two hours).

Feedback from a colleague who participated (and had done the same training workshop on the technique) was that we did two meetings worth of activity and he thought it had worked. All the members of the group were very positive and found the style of meeting very productive. We came away from the meeting with really clear actions, particularly for us as a group. I came out of the meeting feeling pretty buoyant – not always the case with meetings!

The aim of the approach was to focus on giving people space to think effectively and creating conditions for everyone to contribute pretty equally.

Basic structure was :
– a round of ‘what is good for you.’, or ‘what is going well?’ (positive start).
– used a mixture of rounds, ‘listening pairs’ (see Klein’s books for an explanation on how this works), and some discussion, but with respectful listening.
– the discussion came after an individual round where everyone contributed, and after a shared review of the briefing paper on the topic I had sent out in advance. So the discussion was based on everyone’s knowledge. The effect of this seemed to be an incremental building of knowledge and ideas.
– action round, ‘what are you each going to do, and by when?’, ‘what do we need to do?’ – The main notes from the meeting are action points collected from this round.
– ended with a final positive round: I went for, ‘what was successful for you about this meeting?’.

This structure may not sound very different to a lot of other meetings, and I guess it isn’t but some of the difference is about intent. My understanding of this approach is that Klein is arguing for creating a space where people’s thinking can be transformed and to do that we have to address the way we listen, the appreciation we give each other, and the ease we create, so thinking can happen. I don’t think I managed all of this in the way she envisages, but I am working at it, and I’m enjoying trying.

Leave a comment

Filed under Learning, meetings, thinking

Flying by

20120609-090442.jpg

Leave a comment

Filed under thinking, Uncategorized

Dancing so as not to be dead

Ray Bradbury died this week. He was a writer who got the living quality of books and the rich meaning of reading and imagining worlds, both good and bad. “Life is trying things to see if they work“. He was also a man who knew about dancing. In the introduction to Illustrated Man (which is called ‘Dancing, So As Not to Be Dead’), Bradbury writes about a conversation with a waiter about dancing and writing – both represent a way to grab at life and a way to resist to the long sleep of death. ‘”I end as I began with my Parisian waiter friend, Laurent, dancing all night, dancing, dancing, dancing“. Here’s to the memory of a man who could write, and dance.

1 Comment

Filed under books, reading